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Saturday, 04 February 2012 05:32

Landford with Earldoms - The OPC is Sandy Mursell

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Landford - St. Andrew Landford - St. Andrew
Landford - Landford Wood Mission Hall Landford - Landford Wood Mission Hall

Landford Photo Gallery

Contiguous Parishes (our neighbours)

Bramshaw - Downton - Plaitford with Melchet Park - West Wellow - Whiteparish

 

Websites

GenUKI - For information relating to Wiltshire and Landford
Wiltshire & Swindon History Centre - The Wiltshire County Archives for all historical documents and the place to obtain original copies
Wiltshire Community History - Historical information for parishes within the Wiltshire County jurisdiction.
Register of One-Place Studies - Landford Entry

 

The Parish Church of St. Andrew

Parish Registers held at WSHC

Baptisms 1671-1902
Marriages 1671-1986
Burials 1671-1972

 

Parish History

Landford lies near the border of Hampshire at the north edge of the New Forest. The hamlet of No Man's land to the south is partly in both counties. The church (St Andrew) was rebuilt in 1858 by Butterfield. There is an entrenchment known as Castle Hill. [source: The Little Guide, published by Methuen, 1949]

The parish of Landford situated in the south east of Wiltshire, is crossed by the Blackwater River and a prehistoric track, The Cloven Way.  Artefacts from the Mesolithic era, Middle and late Bronze ages have been found in the area.  It is also likely that the Romans were working in Landford.     Landford is mentioned in the Domesday Book, suggesting that a small settlement of 20-30 people existed.  The area is mentioned throughout history, the Royal Forest, titled landowners as well as the earlier recorded facts, right up to the 20th century.      In 1801 the first national census shows 186 people, mainly employed in agriculture and cider making, rising to 358 in 1901.     In 1861 Landford Common was enclosed with most of the land allocated to Lady Nelson (640 of the 740 acres). In the 1870's land to the south was sold at £15 per acre for building. After that the Post Office and shops began to appear; a bus service started during WWI.      Albert Winter of Glebe Farm bred a new strain of Wessex Saddleback pigs and, after his death, his work was continued by Lord Melchet.     During WWII Landford Lodge was occupied successively by The Royal Tank Regiment, Military Police and American troops.     It wasn’t until 1989 that the first known licensed premises arrived in the village, despite the early years of cider making!

Extracts from the Domesday Book

Surveys of the Manors of Philip, First Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery 1631-32

By a comparison of notices in various records, this holding would seem probably to be at Landford, in the hundred of Frustfield.  Jacobus de Lye held (c1270) half a knight’s fee at LANEFORD, under Albreda de Botreaux, a lineal descendant of Waleran.  Test. De Nev. 141.  In 1310 Willelmus de Lye presented to the church at LANEFORD (=Landford). Wilts Inst.  Among the fees of Oliver de Ingham (also a descendant of Waleran) are reckoned LANEFORD as well as STEPEL-LANGFORD. Inq. p.m,. 17 Edw. 111. This is clearly the holding assigned to OTRE in the Exon Domesday (p.189), under the hundred of Frustfield.  It is in no doubt, like the estate just described, a portion of LANDFORD.

Frustfield Hundred

It is difficult to say whether the first element is ‘lang’, ‘long’s or ‘lanu’, - ‘lane’. The majority of early spellings favour the latter and the stream here is so small that the passage across it could not have been a very long one. The ‘d’ is a  much later insertion.

Civil Registration

1896 - Present Salisbury Registration District

 

Buildings and Land

Landford Common Inclosure Notice 1858               Owners of Land 1873        

 

Crime and Legal Matters

Bastardy Examinations

 

Directories

Kellys 1915               Kellys 1923

 

Education

 

National School

The extracts from the School log books below relate mainly to the Moody and King families.  These families are of particular interest to the OPC and are published from her own family history research notes.

School Log Extracts 1863-1869 School Log Extracts 1870-1879 School Log Extracts 1880-1890
School Log Extracts 1917-1927    

 

Emigration and Migration

Strays Index

 

Employment and Business

Agriculture

Gamekeepers Certificates 1807

Communications

British Postal Services Appointments 1737-1969

Situations Vacant                 

1900-1999

 

Miscellaneous Documents

 

Non Conformity and Other Places of Worship

Landford Wood Mission Hall

 

People and Parish Notables

Bankruptcy

Sale of Distressed Stock 1783  

Celebrations and Entertwinment

Celebrations at the Defeat of Napoleon 1814

Census Returns Transcripts

1841          1851          1861          1871          1881          1891           1901           1911

Please note the 1911 Census contains the entries for Earldoms

Correspondence

Letter to John Mitchell from H. Girdlestone 1840

Elections, Polls and Voters Lists

Poll of Freeholders 1772           Poll Book 1818          Poll Book 1865           MP Nominations 2015            MP Nominations 2017

Inquest Reports

John Hatchett 1861

 

Poor Law, Charity and the Workhouse

Alderbury Union Elected Guardians 1835              Workhouse Audit 1858

 

Probate

National Probate Index 1858-1966

Inquisitions Post Mortem of Lands Held

William, Earl of Pembroke 1630 

Parishioners Wills

David Chalk Proved 1813          Elizabeth Chalke Proved 1839           George Jukes proved 1837

 

War, Conflict and Military Matters

Diocese of Salisbury Memorial Book 1914-1918             Why the Poppy

 

 

EARLDOMS

Earldoms Photo Gallery

Parish History

Very little seems to have been written about the Extra Parochial/Civil parish of Earldoms. It was originally a civil parish under Whiteparish, but was transferred to Landford in 1896. (Extra Parochial – not included in any parish and exempt from parish obligations). Prior to the Dissolution, Earldoms was owned by Wilton Abbey, being granted to the Earl of Pembroke. In the 1820/30’s Earldoms covered approximately 630 acres, mainly woodland. In 1811 the total population was 51 and gradually decreased in population until in 1891 there were just 37 inhabitants. An excavation in 1929 uncovered an Iron Age Camp in woodland within Earldoms, where 18 burial urns were found.

Ancient Map

Parish Registers held at WSHC

There are no registers listed for this extra-parochial place

Parish Matters

Civil Registration

1837 - 1896 Alderbury Registration District
1896 - Present Salisbury Registration District

 

Buildings and Land

 

Crime and Legal Matters

 

Directories

Kellys 1889

 

Education

 

Emigration and Migration

 

Employment and Business

 

Miscellaneous Documents

 

Non Conformity and Other Places of Worship

 

People and Parish Notables

Census Returns Transcripts

1841   1851   1861   1871   1881   1891   1901   1911 (see Landford 1911)

Elections and Polls

Poll Book 1818          Poll Book 1865       

Family Notices

Family Notices 1800-1849         

 

Poor Law, Charity and the Workhouse

 

Probate

Inquisitions Post Mortem of Lands Held

William, Earl of Pembroke 1630

Parishioners Wills

 

 

War, Conflict and Military Matters

 

 

 

 

Read 8094 times Last modified on Monday, 24 September 2018 11:22

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